Padmasana


The lotus position is a cross-legged sitting posture originating in meditative practices of ancient India, in which the feet are placed on the opposing thighs. It is an established posture, commonly used for meditation, in the Hindu Yoga and Buddhist contemplative traditions. The position is said to resemble a lotus, to encourage breathing proper to associated meditative practice, and to foster physical stability. Famous depictions of the lotus position include Shiva, the meditating ascetic god of Hinduism, and Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism. Padmasana means Lotus throne and is also a term for actual thrones, often decorated with lotus foliage motifs, on which figures in art sit. In Balinese Hinduism, a prominent feature of temples is a special form of padmasana shrine, with empty thrones mounted on a column, for deities, especially. While doing any asana, it is very important to be alert and be conscious of what we are doing. Concentration and relaxation play a vital role in the practice of yoga. Padmasana is also called kamalasana, which means lotus. The form of the legs while performing this asana gives the appearance of a lotus. It is the best asana for contemplation. As we start the asana, one must become conscious of the body. We must try to visualize the posture one is going to practice. This is actually a form of mental tuning. So we have to visualize before doing the asana. As one takes the right posture, one must close the eyes and be aware of the body. The Muscles must be relaxed. One should feel the touch of the legs on the floor. The focus should then be shifted to the breath. A feeling of peace touches the mind. Sit in this posture for a few Minutes before proceeding to the next asana.


Ways to do :

Sit on the floor with your legs straight in front. . Bend you right knee and bring the lower leg up into a cradle: The outer edge of the foot is notched into the crook of the left elbow, the knee is wedged into the crook of the right elbow, and the hands are clasped (if possible) outside the shin. . Lift the front torso toward the inner right leg so the spine lengthens (and the lower back does not round). . Rock your leg back and forth a few times, exploring the full range of movement of the hip joint. . Bend the left knee and turn the leg out. Rock your right leg far out to the right, then lock the knee tight by pressing the back of the thigh to the calf. . Swing the leg across in front of your torso, swiveling from the hip and not the knee, and nestle the outside edge of the foot into the inner left groin. . Be sure to bring the right knee as close to the left as possible, and press the right heel into the left lower belly. Ideally the sole of the foot is perpendicular to the floor, not parallel. . Now lean back slightly, pick the right leg up off the floor, and lift the left leg in front of the right. To do this, hold the underside of the left shin in your hands. . Carefully slide the left leg over the right one. Snuggle the edge of the left foot deep into the right groin. . Swivel again into position from the hip joint, pressing the heel against the lower belly, and arrange the sole perpendicular to the floor. . Draw the knees as close together as possible. Use the edges of the feet to press the groins toward the floor and lift through the top of the sternum. If you wish, you can place the hands palms up in anjali mudra, with the thumbs and first fingers touching. In the beginning, only hold the pose for a few seconds and quickly release. Remember that Padmasana is a two-sided pose. Therefore, be sure to work with both leg crosses each time you practice. Gradually add a few seconds each week to your pose until you can sit comfortably for a minute or so. Ideally you should work with a teacher to monitor your progress. Experienced students can use it as a seat for their daily pranayama or meditation, but beginners may need to use other suitable positions.

Benifits of

The asana calms the brain. . It stimulates the pelvis, spine, abdomen, and bladder. . Stretches the ankles and knees. . Eases menstrual discomfort. . Consistent practice of this pose until late into pregnancy is said to help ease childbirth. Precautions: Do not perform this asana while suffering from: . Ankle injury . Knee injury Padmasana is considered to be an intermediate to advanced pose. Do not perform this pose without sufficient prior experience or unless you have the supervision of an experienced teacher.


, INDIA

Posted By : Vinod Jindal on Dec 16, 2010


 
 

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